Newsom signs legislation renaming UC Hastings Native American Day

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University of California Hastings College of Law file photo.  Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill changing the school's name to University of California, College of the Law, San Francisco, or UC Law, San Francisco for short.  The school's 19th century founder, Serranus Hastings, committed atrocities against the Yuki people.

University of California Hastings College of Law file photo. Governor Gavin Newsom signed a bill changing the school’s name to University of California, College of the Law, San Francisco, or UC Law, San Francisco for short. The school’s 19th century founder, Serranus Hastings, committed atrocities against the Yuki people.

University of Hastings Facebook page

California Governor Gavin Newsom has signed a bill ordering the name of Hastings College of the Law to be changed from the University of California.

Under the Assembly Bill of 1936, by Assemblyman James Ramos, D-Highland, the college’s new name will be by University of California, College of the Law, San Francisco, or UC Law, San Francisco for short.

The bill also outlines several initiatives for the college to pursue, including renaming the law library with an Indigenous language name and annually reading a statement about the atrocities that school founder Serranus Hastings committed against the Yuki people in the 19th century. The measure will also provide collaborative opportunities for Round Valley tribal students to debate and gain writing experience, according to the governor’s office.

Newsom also signed a set of other bills timed to coincide with Native American Day.

This includes bills to create a “Feather Alert” program, similar to Amber or Silver Alerts, to help law enforcement search for natives who have gone missing under suspicious circumstances; remove the insult “squaw” from all geographic features and place names in the state and create a petition process to review offensive or derogatory place names, and encourage local educational agencies and charter schools to form California Indian Education Working Groups, in partnership with local tribes, to develop a curriculum that highlights the history, culture and government of regional tribes.

“As we elevate the rich history and contributions of California’s diverse tribal communities today, the state recommits to building on the progress we have made to right historic wrongs and help empower people. Indigenous communities,” Newsom said in a statement.

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Andrew Sheeler covers California’s unique political climate for The Sacramento Bee. He covered crime and politics from the interior of Alaska to the oil patch of North Dakota to the rugged coast of southern Oregon. He attended the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

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