Cook with the same crops as many native tribes

0


Cook this delicious recipe using “the three sisters” as ingredients.

Many Native Americans planted corn, beans and squash together.

Because they grow in the same mound in the garden and each crop helps the others, they were called “the three sisters-in-law.” The history of the Three Sisters varies from tribe to tribe.

The corn plant grows tall so the bean vines can climb up the corn plant, reaching the sun. The bean plant provides a necessary nutrient, nitrogen, to help other plants grow. The squash plant spreads over the ground, keeping the roots of each plant moist and cool.

Many people continue to plant their garden crops in this way. Corn, beans and squash – the three sisters – grow better and harder together, all complementing each other!

Have an adult make this delicious recipe with you, using the three sisters as ingredients. You might even be able to find these things at a local farmers market – or plan with your family to plant your own next spring.

Fall Harvest Succotash Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups fresh green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1 small summer squash / zucchini, cut into pieces
  • 3 cups of corn kernels (fresh, frozen or canned)
  • ½ teaspoon of salt
  • 4 tablespoons of butter
  • Pepper, parsley and paprika (to taste)

Instructions:

1. Cook the green beans in a small amount of water until tender. Drain and reserve the cooking water.

In a saucepan, melt butter. Add the corn kernels, squash and 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Add enough reserved cooking water to cover the vegetables. (Courtesy of Iowa State Extension)

2. In a saucepan, melt the butter. Add the corn kernels, squash and 1/2 teaspoon of salt. Add enough reserved cooking water to cover the vegetables.

3. Cook gently for 3 minutes.

4. Reduce heat and cook, without stirring, until most of the liquid is cooked. About 5 to 10 minutes.

5. Pour into a serving dish and sprinkle with a little pepper, parsley and paprika. Enjoy!

Pour into a serving dish and sprinkle with a little pepper, parsley and paprika. (Courtesy of Iowa State University Extension)

This has been adapted from a Nebraska extension activity developed by Carol Fritz, Extension Assistant-4-H, and Kathleen Cue, Extension-Horticulture Assistant.

Iowa State University Extension and Outreach in Linn County helps build a strong Iowa by engaging Iowians in research, education, and extension experiences to address current and emerging real-life challenges.

The 4-H Youth Development program empowers young people to reach their full potential through youth-adult partnerships and research-based experiences. Visit the Linn County Extension Office website to learn more: www.extension.iastate.edu/linn

Share.

Leave A Reply